Wednesday, February 26, 2014


The March Hive
Sunday, March 2, 2014 -- 11am - 3:30pm

Minuteman Technical High School, Rte 2A Lexington, MA

Sponsored by the Lincoln Minutemen


11-12 The Buzz – Come and share a cup of coffee with friends and catch up before the season starts

12-12:20 – Goal for the Season – Documenting One Thing – Take a look at how others are taking on the challenge of documenting one item of their kit!

12:30– 1:30 Hair for Men & Women – Looking at the time period between 1765 – 1788, we’ll explore how hairdos evolved for both men and ladies

1:45 – 2:30 Creamware – Your hair can be perfect, your clothes divine, but your props? Not so much... Inaccurate accouterments can ruin the whole effect.  Sharon Burnston will be sharing her knowledge of creamware.  A closer look at the things used for serving and eating off of.

The Macaroni Courtship 1772
Lewis Walpole Library

 2:45 – 3:30 Breakout Sessions

Bring this Not That – Continue the discussion about ceramic ware.  Bring a piece and let the group help you decide if you should bring it or leave it home

Hair Tips – How do I make my hair look like the one in the portrait – Some tips and traps about wearing wigs.

Shoe Buckles – Didn’t get a chance to get those shoe buckles on last time?  Bring your shoes and get your buckles on once and for all!

Creamware Dishes

Minuteman Technical High School is located on 2A in Lexington, MA.  Use the main entrance, stay straight and follow the signs for Community Education and park at the West Entrance.  Signs inside will direct you to the Hive.
Any questions email hiveworkhops@gmail.com




Monday, February 3, 2014

February's Hive - Sunday Feb 9th - More on the Line-up

Museum of London

Accurate Stockings -- The holy grail!  Until someone finds a working stocking frame, figures out how to use it, and starts cranking out period style stockings, the perfect stocking will probably a remain a fantasy.

So given that perfect reproduction stocking will continue to elude us, what are our alternatives? Join us at The Hive this Sunday, February 9th for a panel discussion that will include stocking expert Carol Kocian (who actually has operated a stocking frame), "Fitting and Proper" author Sharon Burnston and knitting maven Colleen Humphreys.   They will show us examples of 18th century stockings and talk about how they were made as well as what makes for a decent repro stocking-- the good the bad and the ugly.  Following their presentation,  you can join them for a breakout session to continue the discussion.


Additional Breakout Session -- Attaching Your Shoe Buckle

For those of you who have been stumped as to how to get those buckles properly installed on your shoes, leather worker Steven Taskovics will teach you how.  Bring your shoes and buckles and get them on your shoes once and for all!

For more information of Sunday's Hive visit our website www.thehiveoneline.org or email us at hiveworkshops@gmail.com






February Hive - Sunday Feb 9th - Accessories

February Hive -- Sunday Feb 9th - Accessories!

Sponsored by His Majesty's 10th Regiment of Foot


11am - 12pm -- The Buzz -- Grab a cup of coffee and catch up with friends

Lectures:

12 pm - 12:30 pm  -- It's All in the Details (For men & women) - We'll take a closer look at accessories like neck clothes, hats, aprons and handkerchiefs.  Sometimes how you wear things is as important as what you actually wear.

12:30 pm - 1:15 pm -- Knapsacks and Gaiters -- Henry Cooke will discuss two rather ubiquitous accessories that we think we know, but don't often get right.

1:30 pm  - 2:30 pm --Stocking up! : Good, Better, Best  A panel discussion with Sharon Burnston, Carol Kocian & Colleen Humphreys.  Ok, so we don't have the perfect "best" stocking yet, but we do have repros that we can categorize as  "good" or "better".  And then there are some to just "walk away from"!

We'll look at some originals, discuss the characteristics of 18th century stockings and compare them against what is commercially available today.

Breakout Sessions 2:30 - 3:30

Stockings -- Continue the stocking discussion.  Bring you own stockings for review. Take a closer look at originals.

Sleeve Ruffles & Bosom Ruffles -- The GW Ball is coming up!  Perhaps you'd like to doll up your shirt or shift a bit with some ruffles.  Learn how to hem, gather and attach linen ruffles.  Not difficult to do, but there are a few tricks.  We will have kits available that will include fine linen, thread and instructions.  For Gentlemen - Bosom & Sleeve Ruffle for your shirft ($10), For Ladies Ruffle for your shift sleeve ($5).  If you'd prefer to use your own fine linen, bring it along.

Sewing Circle -- Stuck on a sewing project you are working on?  Just want to learn a few pointers?  Henry and Steph will answer your questions, and hopefully get you over that trouble spot that's preventing you from finishing up your latest project.

Shoe Buckles: Can't tell a lachet from a tine?  Are you baffled as to how to attach those buckles to your shoes? Bring your shoes and buckles and leather worker Steven Taskovics will help you attach those buckles!!!

Location: Minuteman Technical High School, Route 2A Lexington MA. Follow the signs for Community Education Parking and use the west entrance

For more information visit www.thehiveoneline.org

For questions: hive workshops@gmail.com

As always, Sunday's Hives are free of charge.  We'll have coffee and tea available.  Snacks to share are always welcome!


Thursday, January 30, 2014

Knapsack Workshop - February 8th


Just an update -- Henry's knapsack workshop will be Saturday, February 8th, not March 8th as previously posted


British and American Knapsack Workshop - Saturday, February 8, Concord, MA


This workshop will provide you with the opportunity to build either a British painted canvas knapsack based on the original British militia knapsack found 20 years ago at the Isaac Royal House in Medford, or an American single pocket, double strap linen knapsack based on the original David Uhl knapsack in the collection of Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site in Newburgh, NY, and another similar one in a private collection, both of which were used by militiamen. Knapsack kits will include pre-cut materials, buckles, thread and instructions needed to construct the knapsack of your choice. Class limited to 12 participants. Cost of kits includes $50 workshop fee.Cost of "Isaac Royal House" pattern British Knapsack Kit - $150    Cost of "David Uhl" pattern American Knapsack Kit - $ 90

To sign up, contact Henry at hcooke4@verizon.net

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Upcoming Workshops - February & March 2014

Hive Workshops for February and March 2014



In Preparation for the Reenacting Season and to Kick off the February Accessories Hive, Henry Cooke will be offering a workshop on knapsacks on February 8th from 9:30- 3:30 at Minute Man National Historical Park. So whether you portray a militia, Continental Army or serve the King, we have a knapsack for you!


British and American Knapsack Workshop - Saturday, February 8, Concord, MA


On April 19, 1775, both British Regulars and the Provincial militia were both carrying knapsacks. This workshop will provide you with the opportunity to build either a British painted canvas knapsack based on the original British militia knapsack found 20 years ago at the Isaac Royal House in Medford, or an American single pocket, double strap linen knapsack based on the original David Uhl knapsack in the collection of Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site in Newburgh, NY, and another similar one in a private collection, both of which were used by militiamen.Knapsack kits will include pre-cut materials, buckles, thread and instructions needed to construct the knapsack of your choice. Class limited to 12 participants. Cost of kits includes $50 workshop fee.Cost of "Isaac Royal House" pattern British Knapsack Kit - $150    Cost of "David Uhl" pattern American Knapsack Kit - $ 90

To sign up, contact Henry at hcooke4@verizon.net





English Gown -- February 8 and March 8 - Concord, MA & Natick, MA

You will be constructing a hand sewn stomacher front / en fourreau back gown based on a period example and constructed in a period manner. This gown is correct style for women reenacting a period of 1760-1780. By the end of the weekend, your gown should be substantially completed. 
Fee: $160 (includes bodice and sleeve lining and printed gown instruction book)
Instructors: Hallie Larkin & Steph Smith
To register, contact: hiveworkshops@gmail.com
Location: Minute Man National Historical Park



English Gown -- March 29 & 30 - Trenton, NJ

We will be offering another English Gown workshop March 29 & 30 at the Old Barracks Museum in Trenton, NJ sponsored by the Brigade of the American Revolution. For more information and to register contact Donna Cole  dlcole10940@yahoo.com



Saturday, January 25, 2014

One Gown: Many Impressions

Larkin & Smith - English Gown Pattern
http://atthesignofthegoldenscissors.com

One of the questions we have been getting about our English Gown Pattern is, "The original is a silk gown, I portray a Rev War camp follower, will this pattern work for me?  The answer is "absolutely" and here's why...

Eighteenth century dress makers were very creative when it came making beautiful gowns. They had fabulous fabrics to work with, ones specifically woven for making gowns, as well as lovely trims and laces designed for adorning these wearable confections.  One the other hand, when it came to the actual "form" of the English Gown, the basic parts and construction were pretty much the same, whether you are making a fancy silk gown or a simple linsey-woolsy one.  Think about a gown as a line drawing - it can be simple and unadorned or you can add color, designs, and decorations.

(These three gowns were made with the same pattern but with different trimmings and fabrics)

If you are portraying a Revolutionary War camp follower, you are reenacting the years from 1775-1783, and will need a gown that works well for that time period.  The stomacher front/en fourreau back gown, not only fits well into that date range, it will also have you covered your for pre-War events like the Boston Tea Party and Battle Road.

Gown with optional cuffs

We have included a few variations in the pattern to help you adapt the gown for your impression.  The original gown is a silk tobine self trimmed with ruching and sleeve flounces.  However, if you are making a gown for a camp follower, you should opt for a simpler and more appropriate sleeve treatment and skip the trimming.  Included in the pattern is a longer sleeve for wearing without sleeve flounces and an optional cuff pattern piece, which you can use for your worsted or linen camp follower gown. However, the most important part, is to select a fabric that is appropriate for your impression and documentable to the period. Do your research, it will pay off in accuracy and confidence in your impression.

Next: The Documentation Card


Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Introducing Larkin & Smith Historical Patterns: English Gown



Ever wish you could attend a gown workshop but couldn’t travel to where it was being held or fit it into your schedule?  Have you put off making an en fourreau/stomacher front English gown because you have no idea how to translate the gridded diagrams from the books in your library into something that resembles a real garment?  Our new pattern will solve your dilemma!

Introducing the first gown pattern from "Larkin & Smith" – and it’s an English Gown.  The gown workshop offered by Hallie Larkin and Steph Smith has been transformed into a pattern along with a 34 page instruction manual with color plates and illustrations.  It is truly a workshop in an envelope.

The instructions will take you through the step by step process of making a reproduction gown using period techniques. We think you will find, as we have, conducting this workshop through the years, that even the novice seamstress, with little to no experience, can create a well fitting and authentically constructed gown.

The pattern is taken from an original in a private collection and is typical of many English gowns made from the 1760s to the end of the 1770s.

The pattern can be purchased through At the Sign of the Golden Scissors website. www.atthesignofthegoldenscissors.com and is available in sizes 34 – 43 (these are bust measurements in stays).  Coming shortly are sizes 45 - 51.

We hope you enjoy using the pattern as much as we enjoyed making it for you!

It's available now at http://atthesignofthegoldenscissors.com/products/18th-century-english-gown

As a thank your for ordering, we'll include 12 longs pins for use in closing your finished gown. Each pattern also includes a documentation card.

Next: About developing the pattern